Blog

Posts by Topic: Disaster Recovery

In the Khumbu: Rebuilding in Thame

The 2015 earthquakes hit Thame hard, leaving the gompa damaged and the monks' hostel uninhabitable. We were glad to pitch in with rebuilding, and now the new hostel is nearly ready for the monks to call home.

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Sherpa community celebrates reopening of Khumjung Gompa

400-year-old Khumjung Gompa, damaged beyond repair by the earthquakes, joyfully reopened its doors to the Sherpa community again this weekend.

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Getting back to the dharma

Two years ago, the Keydong Nunnery in Kathmandu had sustained so much damage it wasn’t possible to walk up the stairs. Today the young nuns are all smiles – between studies, of course.

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Giving the golden years a new shine

We have walked up the stairs to the Tibetan elders' home many times, but this time was different—we were welcomed to their beautiful, newly rebuilt, home.

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A new home for Tibetan elders

Our Tibetan Elders Home in Kathmandu celebrated the opening of a newly-rebuilt residential building, built stronger and more earthquake resistant.

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New foundation, old souls

AHF supports an elders’ home near Swayambhunath, where 50 destitute Tibetan refugees are cared for by a dedicated staff and volunteers from the Tibetan Women’s Association.

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Syabru: rebuilding a village

The two earthquakes of April 25 and May 12 last year brought down every home in the settlement of Syrabru. Thankfully, new earthquake-resistant homes are beginning to come up, one by one.

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The Great Escape, pt. 2: Return to Lo Manthang

Luigi Fieni, AHF art conservator, returns to Mustang to discover the fate of the gompa wall paintings he has poured his heart into.

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Safe again at Namgyal Middle School

Renovations are almost complete at the earthquake damaged Namgyal Middle School for Tibetan refugee children.

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A light at the end of the tunnel

Bakhang Nunnery in Sindhupalchowk, near the Tibet border, was home to 212 nuns, ranging in age from 19 to 98. Many of the nuns were Tibetan refugees who escaped to Nepal to study dharma unhindered.

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